NON POOR ONLY

Rhodes University vice-chancellor Sizwe Mabizela has warned that spiralling university fees are leading to the privatisation and commercialisation of higher education – to the exclusion of poor students. He said the funding shortfall in higher education was forcing universities to rely more on fees for operational requirements, resulting in steep fee increases. “Using student fees to address the financial shortfall in higher education creates a significant financial burden for students who come from poor, rural and working class communities as this makes higher education unaffordable. This also leads to the ‘privatisation’ and ‘commercialisation’ of public higher education, which is meant to serve a good public purpose,” he said.  Mabizela said for some universities, the percentage of state funding had declined to less than 50% of the university’s operating budget.  Wits vice-chancellor Adam Habib added that the issue of student funding was the biggest headache facing universities at the moment. His counterpart at North-West University, Dan Kgwadi, also echoed the statement, saying universities and government needed to boost their efforts to accommodate needy students.  “We have many students who are excluded for financial reasons. It is our responsibility to support bright students who are academically needy. The worst thing is to exclude students for financial reasons,” Kgwadi said.

Rhodes University vice-chancellor Sizwe Mabizela has warned that spiralling university fees are leading to the privatisation and commercialisation of higher education – to the exclusion of poor students. He said the funding shortfall in higher education was forcing universities to rely more on fees for operational requirements, resulting in steep fee increases.
“Using student fees to address the financial shortfall in higher education creates a significant financial burden for students who come from poor, rural and working class communities as this makes higher education unaffordable. This also leads to the ‘privatisation’ and ‘commercialisation’ of public higher education, which is meant to serve a good public purpose,” he said.
Mabizela said for some universities, the percentage of state funding had declined to less than 50% of the university’s operating budget.
Wits vice-chancellor Adam Habib added that the issue of student funding was the biggest headache facing universities at the moment. His counterpart at North-West University, Dan Kgwadi, also echoed the statement, saying universities and government needed to boost their efforts to accommodate needy students.
“We have many students who are excluded for financial reasons. It is our responsibility to support bright students who are academically needy. The worst thing is to exclude students for financial reasons,” Kgwadi said.

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About xcollektiv

In an age where the function of art as a statement and act of resistance is arguably more necessary than ever before, the role of the artist as activist and revolutionary is of vital importance if we are to retain any hope of significant social change. The Xcollective is a creative incubator for collaborative multi-disciplinary projects by visual-artists, writers, filmmakers and performers who are exploring issues of dispossession, trauma, memory and resistance through their work. Our aim is to facilitate and initiate projects that pose questions and draws attention to issues and to connect with ordinary lives through public creative processes. Our intention is to weave an 'in-cooperative' expression that will be comprised of and will infiltrate different media spaces: to reach neglected audiences, and build community and agency around issues of individual and collective importance. The Xcollective's processes are exploratory, (R)-evolutionary, multi-and-inter-disciplinary; and informed by a fomenting creative multilogue. The Xcollective aims to promote the joint ownership of the humanness of community through its participatory creative expression.
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