Bridging the Divide

The caption on this image is taken directly from Cape Town World Design capital bidding proposal. The supposed distinction of being the World Design Capital is “in recognition of cities which recognise design as a tool for social, cultural and economic development.” Contemporary Cape Town remains a segregated city with the postcard veneer of breathtaking beauty and sophisticated cosmopolitanism, but amongst the majority of its citizens the narrative is still one of poverty, inequality and social-and-urban degradation. South Africa is a product of social engineering and an inherently violent structural design which has legitimized and normalized notions of exclusion that sanctions the installation of sharp stones by the City of Cape Town in places where the homeless would have found shelter from the elements. How does this kind of thinking reflect a design ethic that could result in “a safer, more efficient and inclusive home for all?”

The caption on this image is taken directly from Cape Town World Design capital bidding proposal. The supposed distinction of being the World Design Capital is “in recognition of cities which recognise design as a tool for social, cultural and economic development.” Contemporary Cape Town remains a segregated city with the postcard veneer of breathtaking beauty and sophisticated cosmopolitanism, but amongst the majority of its citizens the narrative is still one of poverty, inequality and social-and-urban degradation. South Africa is a product of social engineering and an inherently violent structural design which has legitimized and normalized notions of exclusion that sanctions the installation of sharp stones by the City of Cape Town in places where the homeless would have found shelter from the elements. How does this kind of thinking reflect a design ethic that could result in “a safer, more efficient and inclusive home for all?”

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About xcollektiv

In an age where the function of art as a statement and act of resistance is arguably more necessary than ever before, the role of the artist as activist and revolutionary is of vital importance if we are to retain any hope of significant social change. The Xcollective is a creative incubator for collaborative multi-disciplinary projects by visual-artists, writers, filmmakers and performers who are exploring issues of dispossession, trauma, memory and resistance through their work. Our aim is to facilitate and initiate projects that pose questions and draws attention to issues and to connect with ordinary lives through public creative processes. Our intention is to weave an 'in-cooperative' expression that will be comprised of and will infiltrate different media spaces: to reach neglected audiences, and build community and agency around issues of individual and collective importance. The Xcollective's processes are exploratory, (R)-evolutionary, multi-and-inter-disciplinary; and informed by a fomenting creative multilogue. The Xcollective aims to promote the joint ownership of the humanness of community through its participatory creative expression.
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