Un-Branded

According to Patricia De Lille the City of Cape Town paid King James Advertising Agency and Yellowwood Future Architects an amount of (only) R313 720 to design the City’s new corporate identity and visual language. An additional amount of R7.2m from an existing budget allocation, has however been set aside for high impact collateral and thereafter the new identity will be phased in when ordering new equipment, stationary, signage and vehicles. It cost the xcollektiv one evening of discussion and nine hours of (hard) work to transform the exceptionally bland new design into two dynamic versions that are much more appealing and a truer reflection of the City’s political and socio-economic landscape. In the first version which is closer to the original design, a ring of barbed wire surrounds the centre. In the second version, the Castle plan is at the centre suggesting the fort mentality of the near-militarized zone that is policed by State and private security. Surrounding this is a shutter lens that is suggestive of the Panopticon and the pervading surveillance that serves to protect property before people. A ring of barbed wire then separates this privileged zone from the majority of the citizenry who are relegated to the informal settlements and townships on the blood-stained Cape Flats. And thus: “Making progress impossible together.”

According to Patricia De Lille the City of Cape Town paid King James Advertising Agency and Yellowwood Future Architects an amount of (only) R313 720 to design the City’s new corporate identity and visual language. An additional amount of R7.2m from an existing budget allocation, has however been set aside for high impact collateral and thereafter the new identity will be phased in when ordering new equipment, stationary, signage and vehicles.
It cost the xcollektiv one evening of discussion and nine hours of (hard) work to transform the exceptionally bland new design into two dynamic versions that are much more appealing and a truer reflection of the City’s political and socio-economic landscape.
In the first version which is closer to the original design, a ring of barbed wire surrounds the centre. In the second version, the Castle plan is at the centre suggesting the fort mentality of the near-militarized zone that is policed by State and private security. Surrounding this is a shutter lens that is suggestive of the Panopticon and the pervading surveillance that serves to protect property before people. A ring of barbed wire then separates this privileged zone from the majority of the citizenry who are relegated to the informal settlements and townships on the blood-stained Cape Flats.
And thus: “Making progress impossible together.”

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About xcollektiv

In an age where the function of art as a statement and act of resistance is arguably more necessary than ever before, the role of the artist as activist and revolutionary is of vital importance if we are to retain any hope of significant social change. The Xcollective is a creative incubator for collaborative multi-disciplinary projects by visual-artists, writers, filmmakers and performers who are exploring issues of dispossession, trauma, memory and resistance through their work. Our aim is to facilitate and initiate projects that pose questions and draws attention to issues and to connect with ordinary lives through public creative processes. Our intention is to weave an 'in-cooperative' expression that will be comprised of and will infiltrate different media spaces: to reach neglected audiences, and build community and agency around issues of individual and collective importance. The Xcollective's processes are exploratory, (R)-evolutionary, multi-and-inter-disciplinary; and informed by a fomenting creative multilogue. The Xcollective aims to promote the joint ownership of the humanness of community through its participatory creative expression.
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